The Roots of the Revolution


I might be biased. I understand that.    First of all, I once joined the Communist Party at my urban college.  I later came to understand the weaknesses in the communist utopian idea, but I didn’t swing too far to the right.

I have voted Socialist in several local and national elections. I have voted Green Party.  I am a card carrying member of the ACLU.

Yes.

I am a lefty.   A wicked far to the left Lefty.

But that’s not why I am writing tonight.

I am writing tonight because I keep hearing the word “income inequality” as I listen to BOTH parties in this Presidential election.   I have heard many references to the 99% and to the 1%.

I have heard candidates of both parties speaking with passion about universal health care and reducing student debt and limiting the influence of the corporate elite.

And all I can think of when I hear these things is this:

“Wow. Occupy Wall Street really made a difference.”

And, once again, I am biased.

Because, look:

20111002_PROTEST-slide-UP67-blog480

Yep. That’s my son in the background.

Occupy Wall Street October 1st

Yep. That’s my daughter.

And there was another kid who got arrested with Occupy that night on the Brooklyn Bridge.  He just managed not to make it into the New York Times.

Still.

Anyone who has followed any part of the Occupy Movement must recognize the themes and the slogans that have been adopted by the Presidential candidates.

I am in equal parts amused and annoyed when I hear the candidates talking about the dangers of income inequality and the need to make higher education more affordable.

I mean, really?

I am amused and excited when I hear these ideas being touted by everyone from Bernie Sanders (a real live lefty who talked about these things way before Occupy happened), to Marco Rubio, who honestly sounded like he wasn’t sure of what he was saying.

I am excited when I realize that maybe for the first time in my life the idea of a corporate oligarchy is carrying some weight in a national election.

And I am hugely, enormously proud when I realize that my three children, as well as my son-in-law, were involved in the Occupy Wall Street movement.  I know that without even casting a vote, these four young people have had a huge impact on this Presidential election.

This activist, lefty Mom is very very proud.

And very very hopeful.   Maybe something will finally change in this country.  Maybe we will finally begin to realize that this is in fact supposed to be “government by the people, for the people”.   You never know.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

And one more note about Occupy Wall Street.  My daughter met her future husband when they got arrested together on the Brooklyn Bridge.

Now that’s romance.

 

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6 thoughts on “The Roots of the Revolution

  1. I like to feel hopeful too but sadly none of the candidates seem to have anything to say about Flint, Michigan where Democracy was suspended while the people were poisoned by the wealthy electorate who did it for the benefit of… whom? And this happened in the USA where this is never supposed to happen because we have the greatest democracy in the world?

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    • Whether or not Bernie has addressed Flint directly, his thoughts and his approach would, I think, make this kind of horror less likely, or at least less ignored. I have to be hopeful, but I agree with my sons who do believe that a more aggressive type of revolution is perhaps ahead.

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  2. It’s been inspiring to see so many young people support Bernie and get involved this (most unusual) election year.

    And it looks like you’ve had an amazingly positive influence on your kids. It’s so great to see that they’re passionate enough to actually get out there and walk the talk!

    Like

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