Post-Apocalypse Thoughts


From a time before COVID-19

The economic crash of 2008 hit my small rural community pretty hard. By the Spring of 2009, our neighborhood held as many empty homes as full ones. As the summer came on, even more homes were foreclosed on or simply abandoned.

The woods behind our house began to seem wilder as the humans moved away, and there were entire days when I never heard a sound other than the calling of jays and the hammering of woodpeckers.

During those bleak months, I used to walk my dogs around the block, passing one empty house after another. Sometimes I’d look at the plants growing along the roadside, or at the ducks in the pond across the street, and I’d let my mind wander.

“What if something really terrible happened to the world, and hardly anyone was left?” I’d think. “Could I manage to feed my family with dandelion greens and fiddleheads? Could we learn how to trap birds, or kill ducks or turkeys for food?”

I always had a slightly romantic view of how things would be, of course, because this was just a daydream. All of my grown kids would somehow manage to make their way home, and we’d combine our skills and strengths to build a big garden in our yard. Maybe we’d raise chickens.

I was sure that I’d come through the trauma as a stoic, cheerful, no-nonsense kind of Mamma. I’d clean the fish and make the dinners and be happy to use the bit of power we could get from our solar generator to keep everything clean.

There was a gauzy haze over this dream, as I walked around the quiet streets.

I never thought anything would actually happen.

Now, in the midst of the pandemic of 2020, as we sit in isolation from each other and wonder what in the world will happen next, the reality of a global disaster seems far less romantic.

After about a month of worsening news and scarier headlines, I have come to an interesting conclusion.

I don’t want to forage for edible weeds in the woods. I don’t want to fight my neighbors for toilet paper or soap or cans of tomatoes.

The reality is that not only can my adult sons not move here with their partners, we can’t even get together to share a meal right now.

My daughter and her family live a mere half a mile away across those fertile woods. I’ve been caring for her children every work day for five years. But now, in the age of Covid19, we can’t be together at all. I haven’t seen them since the day that schools were closed, almost three weeks ago.

And I don’t know when I’ll see them again.

We are staying apart, staying away from all other humans, because my daughter is due any day to give birth to her third child. If I leave my house to go to the grocery store, there is a risk that I might bring the virus back and could contaminate Kate and her children.

Because she sees her doctor at our local hospital once a week now, she is afraid that she might contaminate her father and I. So we simply stay apart. In our own little self-isolation pockets.

We’re all living in fear. And we’re all dealing with a total lack of control. Nobody on this entire earth knows what is coming next. Will the virus sputter out in the summer? Will it roar back in the fall? Will a vaccine be found, or a treatment?

Or will millions die? Will the economy of the world totally collapse, based as it is on a continuing flow of commerce?

Will schools ever reopen? Will governments implode into chaos? The truth is, we just don’t know.

Once, a few short years ago, those thoughts were just a way to pass the time as the dogs sniffed the fallen leaves.

Now they are right in front of me. And I am discovering that I am not the hearty pioneer woman I always imagined I’d be. Instead, I’m just another scared and overwhelmed old woman who desperately misses the touch of her children and grandchildren, and who has no desire to harvest cattails for dinner.

13 thoughts on “Post-Apocalypse Thoughts

  1. these are a whole new set of circumstances, that we never could have imagined. it’s normal to feel a sense of longing and grief for the way life was not so long ago, and to feel up and down about it all. i agree, the lack of human contact factor is the very hardest part for me.

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  2. I hope this whole thing is over soon. and you can scoop your grandchildren up into our arms and hug them until they squirm away with giggles. I am doing skype with my grandchildren but, my grandchildren are older and live far away so this space between us is normal.

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  3. It’s definitely an uncertain time and I’m so sorry you’re separated from your beloved family. The U.S. got started on prevention later than we should’ve, but we will get through this. Don’t lose hope. We have more ways to keep in touch now than people did in the past, so we have that at least. Keep writing and sharing. Sending ❤️ from Seattle. –Kat

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  4. I read your post, from the safety of my home here in Australia. I Skype message and call my friend in Nebraska almost daily. I watch the news and see the grim stories coming out of your country. I just want to tell you that this time will pass, it’s looking grim right now, but if we push pass the anxiety, there is hope that we will all emerge a kinder humanity than when we started. I talk to my 13 year old, and we agree that we hope this will be a new beginning, when we value our families above endless consumption. My parents got through World War Two serving in the armed forces, being bombed and on ships sinking, and though they have gone now they would tell me to keep carrying on. We have to keep our hope and our courage alive during this time. Take care hugs

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